The Wall Street-Moscow Axis

Foreword: I am giving the citation data from the masthead of the volume and issue in which the article below first appears. Articles in Straight Talk! on anti-communism, and the penetration of Fabian socialist and far-left forces into Canada, are a researcher’s dream. They are full of quotations backed up with author, title, date and page number. If you are researching Communism in Canada, you can take Straight Talk! to the library and pore over the microfilm to find the documents referred to.

NB: I am featuring these articles for research purposes; not to make any particular political statement. Hope you find them useful. [Ed. NSIM]

Source: Straight Talk! (Originally published by The Edmund Burke Society, now published by The Western Guard)
Date: May-June 1972
Editor: Stefan Lastofka


The Wall Street-Moscow Axis
from Spearhead

Spearhead has maintained (ed. as has Straight Talk!), often to the indignation of some of its readers, that International Capitalism and International Communism are, at the highest levels of control, not antagonistic forces, but work through different means to common ends. We have further maintained that the true ruling powers in the United States, the world’s foremost capitalistic nation, have since the time of Franklin D. Roosevelt conspired constantly to nurture and strengthen the Soviet Bloc.

Since the bulk of the American electorate are firmly anti-communist, this has had to be done by a series of political swindles. Politicians in their speeches to the people have sworn to oppose Communism, but once in power they have dedicated themselves in practice to helping Communism. So it was with Roosevelt, Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy and Johnson. So it is with Nixon.

This is borne out by the latest trade agreement between the U.S and Russia, which is aimed to lead to a free flow of goods between America and all Iron Curtain countries by 1973.

Under the agreement, the U.S. machinery industry will no longer encounter Pentagon opposition to the shipment of machine tools and other equipment to the Soviet Bloc. The U.S. will also permit virtually unhampered export of transportation and production equipment for consumer goods.

The U.S. Government will not interfere with free importation of Soviet raw materials and other products, and U.S. firms will be allowed to work with the Soviet Government to exploit Russia’s natural resources.

The U.S. Government will ask Congress to grant most-favoured-nation status to Russia.

Volte Face

 
A report of the agreement in The Sunday Times headed “How Nixon Came to Love the Soviets” said

“For Nixon the new policy represents a complete volte face. He began his political climb as a newly elected Congressman on the House of Un-American Activities Committee in 1948, when he was one of America’s most rabid ‘commie-haters’.

Now, however, he is faced with the problem of getting re-elected — and the ‘commies’ may be the very people to help him. According to his political advisers, he must wipe out the trade deficit and end the recession if he is to retain the backing of big business.

With a little help from his new communist friends, who are as eager as he is to trade, Nixon could well fight this year’s election with the slogan: “The man who brought the cold war to an end — at a profit.”

Sunday Times is of course being less than complete in its statement of the truth. Certainly Nixon on his way up, like many others, cashed in on grass roots anti-red sentiment and then, having got to the top circles of power, realised that the prevailing sentiment there was pro-red, and accordingly adapted his policies to that fact. True — Nixon has had to engage in his volte face “in order to get the support of big business”, but not in the sense that The Sunday Times implies.

“Big business” in this context does not mean the ordinary American industrial producers worried about the balance of payments (that can easily be remedied by intensifying protective men measures against the flood of imported manufactures).

Big business” means cosmopolitan finance, based in Wall Street, whose policy it is to use American economic strength to foster a Soviet system which without it, and that of the other Western industrial powers, would soon collapse.

One only has to remember the way the U.S. and Canada came to Russia’s rescue with massive wheat supplies at the time of the failure of Kruschev’s harvest to see another example of that.

As for the “cold war”, that has been a phoney issue since its inception, and Nixon is doing nothing new whatever by acting contrary to it.

We say again: Red revolution in Russia, China and all over the world can never be understood except through an appreciation of the […] the International Money Power, with its headquarters in New York, in subsidizing it.

(Reprinted from Spearhead of the NATIONAL FRONT in Britain.)