U.S. Press in USSR Tricked Into False Impressions, 1970 Soviet Defector Says

Category:  Historical Reprints
SourceThe Deseret News, June 17th, 1986


U.S. Press in USSR Tricked
Into False Impressions,
1970 Soviet Defector Says

By David Moneypenny
Deseret News staff writer

 
Dressed as an American hippie, Tomas Schuman defected to the West in 1970 after serving the Soviet govern­ment as a dis­in­for­ma­tion specialist for the KGB-controlled Novosti Press Agency.  He brought with him a mes­sage:  Don’t believe everything you read about the Soviet Union in the American press.

Schuman, born under the name Yuri Bezmenov in Moscow in 1939, said in an interview with The Deseret News his job in the Soviet Union was to manipulate the American press and to give it a false impression of his country.

Schuman spoke at the Sheraton Hotel in Salt Lake City Saturday.

“The methods we use are very primitive, nothing new.  In the United States we call it public relations.  We give them good rooms, good booze and pretty translators,” Schuman said.

“We try to isolate foreign correspondents from the people for at least two months, then we let them talk to preselected people.”

Schuman said journalists are isolated from Soviet society and all interviews are prearranged.

“The correspondent from the New York Times does not notice the difference between the Soviet system and the American system because he never gets near the Soviet system,” he said.

While many of the reporters who go to the Soviet Union are tricked into sending a false impression back to the United States, Schuman said, Americans are skeptical about the reports.

“The trouble is with the big media, not the American people.  The truck driver and the farmer don’t trust the Soviets as much as the media do.  They know the American system is working better than the Soviet system, because they are a part of it.”

Being skeptical is the best way to deal with any information com­ing from the Soviet Union, Schuman said.

Schuman also said American investors in the Soviet Union are con­tributing to the military buildup in that country.  He said American companies help the Soviets to develop new military technologies.

“America is the only country in the history of mankind that feeds and pays its enemy,” he said.  “Every dollar of profit they (the Soviets) make from American investors is used to kill American soldiers in places such as Lebanon.”

Schuman supports the Reagan administration’s strong stance with the Soviet Union and said the Soviets respect it.

“They respect force — it’s the only language they understand.”

Schuman favors an even more aggressive approach.

“The United States has the moral right to invade Nicaragua, Cuba and Granada.  The Soviet Union does not have the right, not moral or economic.”

– 30 –

* Admin:  Unknown to Mr. Schuman (Yuri Bezmenov), the Reagan administration was working hand-in-glove with the USSR and Red China, signing joint education agreements (this per American whistleblower Charlotte Iserbyt, who has the documents to prove it in her database at AmericanDeception.com).

Also unknown to Mr. Schuman, Reagan was a protege of David Rockefeller, and a “Red Star over Hollywood”. Reagan’s name appeared on the letterhead of the World Federalists for many years (This per Gary Richard Arnold who calls Reagan “Red Ronny”).

Reagan was a Red globalist in disguise who put his Hollywood talent for acting to use in the White House for David Rockefeller.  In 1979, Reagan helped Rockefeller launch the Leninist regional union in North America by calling for a free flow of goods, people and money across the borders of North America.  He then re­spon­ded to an “invitation” from the Reds embedded in Canada to advance the continental merger under the guise of Canada-USA free trade, and on to NAFTA.

– 30 –

 

A Disillusioned Spy Changes His Country

Category:  Historical Reprints.
SourceOttawa Citizen December 21, 1977.


A Disillusioned Spy Changes His Country

By Hazel Strouts
Citizen staff writer

 
The past is another country.
 
Tomas Schuman is a genial be-jeaned 39 with greying hair and glasses.

He works as a graduate teaching assistant at Carleton University where he is studying for an M.A. in journalism.  His exams start next week.

He takes those exams although he has been in journalism for most of his working life:  but it was a different life.

He had another name, worked in another language, lived in a different country and had a different view of journalism.

Schuman was a Soviet spy.

His official title was information officer for the Novosty Press Agency.  But all Novosty agencies are undercover spy operations according to Schuman.

“Every employee, at some point, has to report to the KGB,” he said.

He thinks this is self-evident and is incredulous that some westerners see no connection between Soviet external “correspondents” and the KGB, the Russian secret police.

He is impatient with CBC producer Mark Starowicz, who sold information to an Ottawa-based Soviet journalist, claiming he did not know the man was a spy.

“I don’t understand Starowicz,” he says.

“Either he was a complete idiot or he was working for the KGB.”

In the late 1960s, Schuman worked for the Novosty Press Agency in New Delhi, India.  He had studied Southeast Asian languages as a student at Moscow University and was well equipped for the post.  He speaks Urdu, Hindi and English as well as Ukrainian and Russian.

His job was not to explain India to Russians but to sell Russia to India.  He had to “spread Soviet propaganda,” by corrupting officials, newspaper editors and journalists.

He said he was told to befriend Indian journalists in the local press club and “sound them out.”  If they worked for a paper with a large circulation he would report on whether he considered them bribable.

“We would offer free trips to Russia,” with all expenses paid and cash bonuses disguised as “contingency money,” Schuman said.

This was done discreetly.  The higher the position of the man to be bribed, the more discretion was used in handing over the bribe, he said.

A Soviet agent might chat with the “subject” during a cocktail party, then press on him an envelope containing rupees.

The agent would say the money was for “emergencies” on the forthcoming trip to the Soviet Union.

The reaction was generally genuine surprise, followed by a decision to laugh the matter off rather than question what the money was actually for, said Schuman.  The “subject” knew the trip was all-expenses paid.

Schuman calls this “selective blindness.”

Schuman said his disillusionment with his job was complete when the Delhi agency created a new department specializing in building up dossiers on prominent New Delhi residents.  Schuman’s job was to gather information on leading Indian figures to be used for blackmail purposes or to be fed to “native” sources for publication.

The idea, he said, was to whitewash some and blackwash others.  Former prime minister Indira Gandhi was a candidate for the whitewash treatment, he said, but he was unable to say which Indians were given the blackening treatment.

Schuman said defection by Soviets in India is difficult because of a Soviet-Indian agreement that all defectors be returned.  Schuman defected when “India was full of American hippies.”

These were periodically rounded up by the Indian police and sent back to the United States by the U.S. Embassy.

Schuman tied a bandana round his head, grew a beard, wound chains of beads round his neck and waited to be picked up.

He wasn’t.

Eventually he had to make his escape by persuading some American journalists to get him to Athens, Greece and there he contacted the U.S. embassy and asked for help.

In 1970, he came to Canada, adopted a new name and experienced more forcefully than most, the truth of the poet’s words:

“The past is another country.  They do things differently there.”

– 30 –

 

Ex-Red Newsman Hits ‘Negativism’

Category:  Historical reprints
Source:  The Spokesman-Review, November 8, 1984


Ex-Red Newsman Hits ‘Negativism’

By Tim Hansen, Staff writer

 
Americans shouldn’t believe newspaper and television stories that offer “intense negativism” about the United States, a former employee of the Soviet news agen­cy Novosti said Wednesday.

“Articles can be constructive or destructive,” said Tomas Schuman.  “Many articles are too pessimistic for the moral fiber of this country.  Some negativism is unhealthy and some is the result of Soviet propa­ganda.”

Schuman, 45, is on a speaking tour arranged by American Opinion Speakers Bureau, a branch of the John Birch Society.  He was in town to speak Wednesday night at Garfield Elementary School.

According to a John Birch Soci­ety press release, Schuman was born near Moscow, graduated from Moscow State University and went to work for Novosti, a Soviet news agency.

Schuman defected to the West in 1970 while working at the Soviet embassy in New Delhi, India, the release says.  He now is a Canadian citizen living in Los Angeles as the guest of a friend, he said.

In addition to handling news, No­vosti was a “huge public relations agency” that did its best to show pleasant aspects of the Soviet Un­ion to foreign visitors, he said.

While in India, Schuman said, it was part of his job to manipulate Indian journalists so that positive information about the Soviet Union or stories designed to promote a So­viet point of view would be published.

In the United States, he said, half of the negativism is encouraged by the Soviets.

“I’m trying to tell people how the process of disinformation affects their day-to-day life and how to recognize false stories and what to do about it,” Schuman said.  “They should not believe the intense nega­tivism about this country.

“This is the best system — may­be not the perfect one — but let’s face it; it’s the best.  And when the normal person reads bad things about this country and good things about Cuba, Nicaragua and the So­viet Union, it’s a lie.”

He said it’s a “question of bal­ance” of news in the media.

“If day after day the average cit­izen is exposed to negative reports about this country, subconsciously he feels bad about this country, Schuman said.

Part of Novosti’s role was to con­coct phrases such as right-wing death squads and national liber­ation movement, he said.

“These are highly trained psy­chologists who coin these phrases.” Schuman said.  “Take national liberation movement.  They are not nationalistic, they don’t liberate anyone and they are not movements … they’re nothing but a bunch of professional murderers trained in my country.”

– 30 –
 

‘Brainwashed in Spirit of Hatred’:  War Games Reveal Kremlin Mind, Says Immigrant

Category:  Historical Reprints.
Source:  The Montreal Gazette, December 16, 1974


‘Brainwashed in Spirit of Hatred’:
War Games Reveal Kremlin Mind, Says Immigrant

By Tomas Schuman

 
As a former Soviet citizen and reserve officer of the Soviet Army, I would like to tell my Canadian friends about three common and, to my mind, dangerous myths related to East-West military confrontation and the level of defence that a country like Canada should maintain.

Detente is a dangerous myth, for while the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) countries cut their military spending the Warsaw bloc builds up its aggressive might in Europe.

So far, detente exists only on paper or in the minds of politicians.  No real willingness to come to peace terms with the West has been demonstrated by the communist bloc.  People of the socialist countries are basically as unaware of commonly accepted truths about the West as before.  The Soviets are still convinced that “U.S. imperialism” is going to attack them any minute, and the Eastern communist leaders continue to brainwash their people in the spirit of war paranoia.  Do not believe me — take any issue of the Soviet newspaper Pravda.

The Soviet citizen is as unfree to go out of his country as before, and no foreign newspapers are allowed in the communist countries.  So detente exists only for the leaders, dining and drinking in each other’s capitals, but not for the people of communist countries.

Yes my people, Russians, may be as peaceful as the Chinese or as the Canadians.  But it will not be the people who fight, it will be the armies, and the communist armies are highly disciplined, unlike the U.S. army, thoroughly
 

Dialogue: A column open to express viewpoints on topics of interest.  Tomas Schuman, who has lived in Canada for more than four years, is an announcer-producer with CBC International.

 

brainwashed in the spirit of hatred of the “decadent West.”

To give an example:  when I was a student at Moscow State University, I had to undergo military training as a reserve military intelligence officer.  For our war games, our instructors used the maps of West Germany and the U.S.A.  That shows the intentions of the Kremlin.  I have never seen any Canadian youths in universities or schools playing war games with maps of the U.S.S.R.  That is good.

“Do not act aggressively, and the aggressor will never touch you”:  that does not work with communism, or fascism.

From the communist, fascist or territorist philosophical viewpoint the West is historically doomed, capitalist democracy is corrupt.  Just by definition you are, in the West, wrong any way.  According to Marxist dogma, you have to give way to the “better system” of centralized dictatorship of the party, the GULAG system.  But, says the doctrine, the ruling imperialist circles are fighting for their survival.

Therefore, using military force to save oppressed Canadians from their industrialists is inevitable.  In this context peacefulness and disarmament are signs of weakness, that is exactly what tempts the Soviet and other totalitarian leaders to strike the first blow.

What I would suggest to a country like Canada is to spend more money for an information system which tells Canadians and people outside Canada more about the positive aspects of the Canadian Armed Forces, about the peacekeeping role of Canadians.  The army must be respected by the population.  Canada must not allow her army to be demoralized by hysterical protesters as happened in the U.S.

One more idea from a Russian immigrant:  promote peace.

Spend more money for international broadcasting of the CBC in Russian and other East European languages.

Canadians have to break through the censorship of the communist countries and explain to the Soviets and other people beyond the iron curtain that you are a peaceful people, that Canada stands for friendship, open society, freedom of movement, of ideas and people.  Russians do not know about this because the Soviet propaganda machinery, of which I myself was a part five years ago, tells my people that the communist bloc is constantly being threatened by NATO (and that includes Canada) and that on the other hand, poor Canadians dream of being liberated by the glorious Soviet army.

Convince the Russians that it is not tru — spend more money for broadcasting on shortwave beamed to the communist countries.  Words are more powerful these days than bullets, and the Kremlin knows that very well.  That is why Moscow is so afraid of international satellite broadcasting.  Spend more for the propaganda of peace, in the long run it may come cheaper than rockets and tanks.

– 30 –

 

U.S. Press in USSR Tricked Into False Impressions, 1970 Soviet Defector Says

Category:  Historical Reprints
SourceThe Deseret News, June 17th, 1986


U.S. Press in USSR Tricked
Into False Impressions,
1970 Soviet Defector Says

By David Moneypenny
Deseret News staff writer

 
Dressed as an American hippie, Tomas Schuman defected to the West in 1970 after serving the Soviet govern­ment as a dis­in­for­ma­tion specialist for the KGB-controlled Novosti Press Agency.  He brought with him a mes­sage:  Don’t believe everything you read about the Soviet Union in the American press.

Schuman, born under the name Yuri Bezmenov in Moscow in 1939, said in an interview with The Deseret News his job in the Soviet Union was to manipulate the American press and to give it a false impression of his country.

Schuman spoke at the Sheraton Hotel in Salt Lake City Saturday.

“The methods we use are very primitive, nothing new.  In the United States we call it public relations.  We give them good rooms, good booze and pretty translators,” Schuman said.

“We try to isolate foreign correspondents from the people for at least two months, then we let them talk to preselected people.”

Schuman said journalists are isolated from Soviet society and all interviews are prearranged.

“The correspondent from the New York Times does not notice the difference between the Soviet system and the American system because he never gets near the Soviet system,” he said.

While many of the reporters who go to the Soviet Union are tricked into sending a false impression back to the United States, Schuman said, Americans are skeptical about the reports.

“The trouble is with the big media, not the American people.  The truck driver and the farmer don’t trust the Soviets as much as the media do.  They know the American system is working better than the Soviet system, because they are a part of it.”

Being skeptical is the best way to deal with any information com­ing from the Soviet Union, Schuman said.

Schuman also said American investors in the Soviet Union are con­tributing to the military buildup in that country.  He said American companies help the Soviets to develop new military technologies.

“America is the only country in the history of mankind that feeds and pays its enemy,” he said.  “Every dollar of profit they (the Soviets) make from American investors is used to kill American soldiers in places such as Lebanon.”

Schuman supports the Reagan administration’s strong stance with the Soviet Union and said the Soviets respect it.

“They respect force — it’s the only language they understand.”

Schuman favors an even more aggressive approach.

“The United States has the moral right to invade Nicaragua, Cuba and Granada.  The Soviet Union does not have the right, not moral or economic.”

– 30 –

* Admin:  Unknown to Mr. Schuman (Yuri Bezmenov), the Reagan administration was working hand-in-glove with the USSR and Red China, signing joint education agreements (this per American whistleblower Charlotte Iserbyt, who has the documents to prove it in her database at AmericanDeception.com).

Also unknown to Mr. Schuman, Reagan was a protege of David Rockefeller, and a “Red Star over Hollywood”. Reagan’s name appeared on the letterhead of the World Federalists for many years (This per Gary Richard Arnold who calls Reagan “Red Ronny”).

Reagan was a Red globalist in disguise who put his Hollywood talent for acting to use in the White House for David Rockefeller.  In 1979, Reagan helped Rockefeller launch the Leninist regional union in North America by calling for a free flow of goods, people and money across the borders of North America.  He then re­spon­ded to an “invitation” from the Reds embedded in Canada to advance the continental merger under the guise of Canada-USA free trade, and on to NAFTA.

– 30 –

 

Ex-Spy

Category:  Historical Reprints.
Source:  “Ex-Spy”, The Tuskaloosa News, February 20, 1985.

Foreword:

 
This half-item is from the Tuskaloosa News in Google Newspapers.  The front half is missing from the Google scans.  I’ve combed the issue, and all issues before and after it, and there is no sign of that page 1.  However, every bit of news on Tomas Schuman/Yuri Bezmenov is worth having, so here is the “rest” of it.


Category:  Historical Reprints.
SourceStraight Talk! Published By The Edmund Burke Society.
 

Ex-Spy

[First page missing, sorry:]

[…] high price, he said, since he had to leave a wife and daughter in Russia.

“I had to, it’s virtually impossible to take them out,” he said.  “When I think about friends and family, of course I regret.

“I still love my country and I always will — my country good or bad — but I do not like the system that was imposed in my nation.”

Schuman said the United States is “the best” nation “not simply because of human rights, civil rights and welfare checks … but mainly because it is the most productive nation, most productive economical system of free market capitalism and the form of the government which is called a republic.

Tomas Schuman holds copy of magazine he helped subvert

Tomas Schuman holds copy of magazine he helped subvert

“And if you want to (impress) Asians, Africans and Latin Americans about the advantages of your system, you shouldn’t (expound) Democracy or human rights or civil rights — they are all fake.

“You should (expound) capitalism,” he said.  “Mexicans or Indians may not necessarily understand what Democracy is — try to explain it to Filipinos, who live under President Marcos — but they definitely enjoy something that is manufactured in the United States and available on the market.”

The claim that peace can be reached through negotiations with the Soviet Union “Is a big fat lie,” Schuman said, and added “the war goes on right now.”  “You are not living in a time of peace, you are in a state of war — the war goes on all across the world, all over this planet.

“The main enemy (of the Soviets) is not some mythical capitalist,” he said.  “The main target of this war is you people, your civilisation, your system of individual responsibility, your form of government…

“And yet your media creates an impression that there is peace.” he added.

Schuman said Soviet “manipulation of public opinion” changes “the perception of reality” in the United States so that Americans concern themselves with “non-issues.”

Such non-issues promoted in the United States by Soviet subversion include “civil rights, human rights, homosexual rights, blacks and whites, greens and yellows .. free education, welfare state, redistribution of wealth, birth control — all kinds of things that may or may not necessarily have any relevance to your problem.”

Schuman said a younger generation taking over in the Kremlin could lead to a liberalization of policies in Russia “but only if the United States establishment … stops aiding communism in my country.”

He said western bankers and economic system “prop up” what he described as the “ruling junta” in Russia by “extending billions of dollars in credit” and by selling the Soviets technology and grain.

– 30 –